Sunday, 26 August 2007

France Long Stay Visa (for Families)

I plan to update this entry as we prepare our visa applications. Lasted Updated 26/10/2007.

<Requirements as listed on the NZ French Consulate Web site>

French Regulations regarding visa applications changed on January the 1st 2003. Those applying for a visa to France or its dependant territories must now visit the French Consulate in person during the hours that it is open to the public (Monday to Friday, from 9.15am to 1.15pm).
New Zealanders who wish to stay in France for longer than three months require a long stay visa. In order to apply for a long stay visa, you require the following items :
Listed RequirementWhat does this mean?Status
Four application forms(to be completed in French)as well as a recent passport-sized photographForms + Translation
4 Passport Photographs x 5
Pending
Done
Valid travel documentation
(valid for at least three months longer than the visa applied for)
Passports x 5

(Could imply air tickets - see below)
Done
An insurance policy covering medical risks and civil liability for the duration of the stay Comprehensive Insurance
(Through Southern Cross?)
+ Translation
Pending
Police clearance form (see consent to disclosure of information form below)Embassy does this themselves. Sign a disclosure form.

You can check your own records through DOJ web site
Clear Records


Done
Medical certificate issued to you by one of our four registered doctors in New Zealand Simple Medical Checkup x 5Done
Documents providing proof of your financial stability (official letter from your sponsor, your banker, bank statements, any other proof of sufficient financial means...)Research indicates that you need a minimum of E3,000 per adult. We are allowing E10,000 for the family.
+ Translation
Ready
A letter from your host stating your address of residence in the country during your stay and his/her desire to host youConfirmed accommodation arrangements for the duration (not just a hotel booking)
+ In French
Getting close!
A declaration stating that you will not have paid employment without authorisation at any point during your stay(a decleration is required for each adult applying)Statement should support purpose of travel (i.e. not working)
+ Translation
Pending
A pre-paid return courier pack for the return of your passport Pending
Visa application fees*(to be paid by BANK cheque, made out to « French Embassy » or in cash). Visa fees are submitted to change every fortnight - pease contact us to find out the current cost of these fees. No fees are required for children as they are endorsed on their parents passports.Pending
WAITING PERIOD : As applications must be sent to the French authorities for authorisation, there will be a waiting period of two to three months before your visa can be issuedPending

Not listed as a requirement

School Arrangements:
Other research has highlighted that the review authority will expect details on school enrollment. Ideally a confirmation from the school in question. Challenge: Getting the documentation from the school without a first having a visa and timing relative to school year (we arrive at the start of term 2).
Pending
Travel Documentation:
Pretty sure we will need return air tickets open for 1 year
Pending

Other Documentation:

  • Birth Certifcates (Translated)
  • Marriage Certificate (Translated)

Visa refusal

The main grounds for a visa refusal are : security, character, risk of illegal migration, insufficient financial resources, category of visa inconsistent with purposes and/or circumstances of the applicant. However, by law, reasons for denying a visa may not be disclosed. The exceptions to this rule concern foreign nationals who have statutory residency rights such as dependents of French nationals or European Union citizens living in France.

A refusal of a visa for France may be reviewed by a statutory review board :

Commission de recours contre les décisions de refus de visa d’entrée en France, BP 83609 - 44036 Nantes Cedex 1 (France). The Consulate-General of France does not provide advice on appeals.

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